Rural Generalism

Rural Generalists are trained to deliver comprehensive primary care, inpatient and emergency care, and advanced care in disciplines such as obstetrics and mental health, in rural and remote communities. Rural Generalism is a route to a diverse career, with deep community connection, adventure and a true sense of purpose. Rural Generalists can work in general practice, Aboriginal Medical Services, Royal Flying Doctor Services, hospitals, and expedition and international aid settings.

Clinical Practice

Rural Generalists may work in public, private and community settings and practice across general practice, inpatient and emergency care and in advanced skill disciplines.

 

Top 5 reasons to choose Rural Generalism

Rural Generalism – Information

Training program overview

Rural generalism is a route to a diverse and challenging career involving deep community connection, adventure, and a true sense of purpose. The Queensland Rural Generalist Pathway (The Generalist Pathway) provides medical graduates with a supported training pathway to a career in rural and remote medicine; and rural and remote communities with a skilled medical workforce. The broad skill set required of a Rural Generalist (RG) also provides an exceptional foundation training for almost any medical career path, including specialties outside of rural generalism.

 

Pathway trainees are required to enrol with one of the general practice training colleges to complete their training.

 

Rural Generalism Vocational Training is delivered by:

  • The Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM)
  • The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)
  • The Remote Vocational Training Scheme (RVTS)

 

ACRRM’s Fellowship provides a broad range of knowledge and skills to produce safe, confident and independent RGs who provide their communities with excellent health care. This is achieved through the breadth and depth of a competency-based, skills-focused curriculum, developed by rural doctors for rural doctors. The Fellowship is made up of three years Core Generalist Training and a minimum of 12 months Advanced Specialised Training. (N.B. Part-time training must average no less than 16 hours per week over 12 months).

 

RACGP’s Rural Generalism Fellowship is awarded in addition to the vocational Fellowship of the RACGP. It aims to develop additional rural skills and broaden options for safe, accessible and comprehensive care for Australia’s rural, remote and very remote communities. The Rural Generalism Fellowship (four years full time) features 12 months hospital training, 18 months in community-based general practice, 12 months of additional rural skills training and six months of core emergency medicine training. (N.B. Part-time training must be undertaken at a minimum of two days per week within a minimum 14.5-hour working week).

 

Both RACGP and ACRRM expect Fellowship to be achieved within six years FTE from the start of training. This cap includes all training terms, including an additional 52 weeks FTE to complete additional skills training beyond an initial advanced skill, and another 52 weeks FTE to allow for leave and extensions of training time, if required.

 

The RVTS is a flexible, government-funded program providing vocational training for medical practitioners in remote and isolated communities and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities throughout Australia. Supervision is facilitated remotely and delivery caters to the unique needs of doctors working in remote communities by supporting them to achieve ACRRM or RACGP Fellowship through a distance education model. It allows training to be completed in an accredited post, without leaving a rural community.

 

Supervision is facilitated remotely and delivery caters to the unique needs of doctors working in remote communities by supporting them to achieve ACRRM or RACGP Fellowship through a distance education model. It allows training to be completed in an accredited post, without leaving a rural community.

 

Both FRACGP-RG and FACRRM are recognised endpoints for rural generalist training on state and territory rural generalist programs.

The Generalist Pathway

Training with The Generalist Pathway commences from internship and most trainees will complete their General Practice fellowship within four to five years.

 

PGY1 & 2: Prevocational years – As an Intern and Junior Doctor, trainees have guaranteed access to a term placement in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Anaesthetics. Extended rural terms offer additional hands-on experience with the opportunity to undertake further exclusive workshops also available.

 

PGY3, 4 & 5: Advanced Specialist Training (PGY3) | Vocational Training (PGY 4 & 5) — During PGY 3, 4 and 5, depending on the training College, trainees have the flexibility to tailor their training in a variety of facilities and settings to meet training requirements including, hospital, community primary care or other settings in rural community.

 

Advanced specialist training involves 12 months of training in a discipline of choice such as Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Anaesthetics or Mental Health. In addition to being an RG, trainees have the potential to obtain roles in clinical leadership, international aid work, expeditionary and retrieval medicine, or other specialist training.

 

College-selected trainees may be allocated to training posts by:

  • College
  • Queensland Health pathway/network (centrally coordinated)
  • Queensland Health facility (accredited for training)

 

Eligibility for college training is determined by citizenship status, medical qualification and medical registration. All applicants must have Australian Medical Council recognised medical qualifications to be eligible for training. Applicants should seek current eligibility criteria from the relevant college or training provider.

Training Sites

For information on training sites visit:

 

QRGP prevocational training hospitals

 

QRGP AST training and employment maps

 

ACRRM training sites

 

Contact RACGP for training site information

Queensland Organisations
Queensland Government – The Generalist Pathway The Queensland Rural Generalist Pathway (The Generalist Pathway) supports junior medical officers with targeted training and development to become a Rural Generalist or go on to any other medical field.
Northern Queensland Regional Training Hubs (NQRTH) Northern Queensland Regional Training Hubs is in partnership between private and public hospital and health services, GP clinics and James Cook University, who are all committed to improving the health services of rural and remote communities in the northern Queensland region.
JCU – General Practice Training (jcugp.edu.au) James Cook University (JCU) provides training in the medical specialty of general practice through their GP training program. It is delivered through the College of Medicine and Dentistry under contract to the Australian Government and is part of the Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) Program. The AGPT Program is a postgraduate vocational training program for medical graduates pursuing a career in general practice. The program provides training towards fellowship with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and / or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine.
General Practice Training Queensland (focus on South East Queensland) General Practice Training Queensland (GPTQ) under contract with the Australian Government Department of Health, deliver the AGPT Program. They work with a network of committed medical training practices across South East Queensland to provide an apprenticeship-style training environment, complete with hands-on-experience and instruction that supports registrars to become outstanding GPs.
Rural Doctors Association of Queensland (RDAQ) Rural Doctors Association Queensland was formed in 1989 to improve the health of rural and remote Queenslanders and support rural doctors and their families. Health professionals in these communities face unique challenges. RDAQ is a tenacious advocate for improved health outcomes and sustainable workforce for remote and rural Queensland.
Health Workforce Queensland Health Workforce Queensland is a not-for-profit, non-Government Rural Workforce Agency (RWA) for primary health workforce in Queensland, focused on making sure remote, rural, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island communities and have access to highly skilled health professionals when and where they need them, now and into the future. Rural Workforce Agencies have a unique track record and experience in supporting communities to address health workforce shortages and assist the rural health workforce.

National Organisations
Australian Government Department of Health – Pathway for AGPT Program The AGPT Program trains medical registrars in general practice. Registrars who achieve their fellowship under the program can work as GPs anywhere in Australia. It provides full-time, on-the-job training for Australian and overseas-trained doctors who want to specialist in general practice. The program offers 1,500 training places in cities and regional, rural, and remote areas of Australia each year.
Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine The Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) is accredited by the Australian Medical Council for setting professional medical standards for training, assessment, certification and continuing professional development in the speciality of general practice. The ACRRM are the only college in Australia dedicated to rural and remote medicine and play an important role in supporting junior doctors and medical students considering a career in rural medicine.
Royal Australian College of General Practitioners The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) is the voice of GPs in our growing cities and throughout rural and remote Australia. They cultivate a stronger profession by helping the GPs of today and tomorrow continue their professional development throughout their careers, from medical students and GPs in training to experienced GPs.
Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA) RDAA is the peak professional body representing the interests of rural and remote doctors and the communities they live and work in. They are committed to building and maintaining a workforce of highly skilled and motivated rural medical practitioners which requires adequate training and proper incentives, remuneration and support.
Remote Vocational Training Scheme LTD The Remote Vocational Training Scheme is a vocational training program for medical practitioners in remote and isolated communities throughout rural and remote Australia. The purpose of the program is to train doctors in remote communities for remote communities. The training provided meets the requirements for fellowship of both ACRRM and RACGP.
John Flynn Prevocational Doctor Program The John Flynn Prevocational Doctor Program (JFPDP) is part of the Australian Government’s long-term strategy to attract more doctors to practice in remote and rural Australia and improve the quality of healthcare in these areas. The JFPDP, set to commence 1 January 2023, will better streamline, and coordinate medical training in regions and fund new rural primary rotations to boost training capacity for the next generation of doctors. The JFPDP will consolidate the two funding streams under the Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund – core and rural generalist. Doctors will gain skills in managing chronic disease and delivering primary and preventative care, rather than focusing on acute care in hospitals.
General Practice Registrars Australia General Practice Registrars Australia is an independent organisation run by GP trainees, for GP trainees. We provide the next general of GPs with free support, advice, and resources.

History of the Queensland Rural Generalist Pathway

Rural generalist medicine was founded in Queensland as a generalist medical discipline in 2005 by a group of key stakeholders convened to develop the concept of a supported training pathway to a career in rural medicine.

The Roma Agreement had a goal to develop and sustain an integrated service and training program to form a career pathway supplying the rural generalist workforce that the bush needs and its principles continue to underpin the pathway to this day.

Rural generalist medicine was formally recognised as a discipline by the State of Queensland in 2008 through the Medical Officers’ (Queensland Health) Certified Agreement (No.1) 2005.

The Queensland Rural Generalist Pathway formally commenced in 2007, training doctors in rural generalist medicine that enables both primary and specialist services (such as obstetrics, anaesthetics and mental health) to be delivered in rural communities.

Rural generalist training in Australia

Since the inception of a Rural Generalist Pathway in Queensland, other States and Territories have adopted similar pathways for medical students and junior doctors within their jurisdictions.

Recognising the critical role of Rural Generalists in delivering high quality, accessible health care to regional, rural and remote communities across the country, the Federal Government appointed Australia’s first National Rural Health Commissioner in 2017.

The Commissioner’s first priority is the develop a national Rural Generalist Pathway in collaboration with the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine.